Happy New Year!

Dear Readers,

As 2014 winds down to a few hours left, I decided to write a short note to you.  First, I want to thank Gladius for encouraging me to start this blog, because without his kind words and directing me to WordPress, as a user-friendly blogging site, libertybellediaries would not exist.  Without readers, there would be little point to continue this blog, so let me extend my heartfelt thank-you to each of you for taking time out of your busy day to read my blog.  That I actually have readers continues to surprise, yet delight me, and my intent is to offer my blog as an opportunity for conversation.

Please feel free to offer opinions, criticisms, advice, at any time.  For those, who have commented, thank you for the wisdom you have added.

In 2015, instead of blabbering on about what is wrong in America, I’m hoping we can branch out and start brainstorming about how to fix what’s broken, mend what’s torn asunder, heal what is ailing our great country.

From bartleby.com (http://www.bartleby.com/360/4/109.html)

III. Faith: Hope: Love: Service

What I Live For

George Linnæus Banks (1821–1881)

I LIVE for those who love me,
Whose hearts are kind and true,
For heaven that smiles above me,
 And waits my spirit, too;
For all the ties that bind me,
For all the tasks assigned me,
And bright hopes left behind me,
 And good that I can do.

I live to learn their story
  Who’ve suffered for my sake,
To emulate their glory,
And follow in their wake;
Bards, patriots, martyrs, sages,
The noble of all ages,Whose deeds crown history’s pages,
  And Time’s great volume make.

I live to hold communion
  With all that is divine,
To feel there is a union
  ’Twixt Nature’s heart and mine;
To profit by affliction,
Reap truths from fields of fiction,
And, wiser from conviction,
  Fulfil each grand design.

I live to hail that season,
  By gifted minds foretold,
When men shall rule by reason,
  And not alone by gold;
When man to man united,
And every wrong thing righted,
The whole world shall be lighted
  As Eden was of old.

I live for those who love me,
  Whose hearts are kind and true,
For heaven that smiles above me,
  And waits my spirit too;
For the cause that lacks assistance,
For the wrong that needs resistance,
For the future in the distance,
  And the good that I can do.

Happy New Year and Best Wishes for you all through the year:-)

Sincerely,

Libertybelle

4 Comments

Filed under General Interest

4 responses to “Happy New Year!

  1. JK

    One can get a pretty good idea of the tone of the celebrations at “JK Central” by my trying to time a blog comment sober.

    Happy New Year !!! Y’all !!!

  2. JK

    Uh oh.

    Wrong timezone.

    Figures.

  3. …”By the rude bridge/That arched the flood/Their Flag to April’s breeze unfurled/Here the embattled Farmers stood/And fired the shot heard ’round the world”…—William Wadsworth Longfellow’s “Concord Hymn”

    Our forefathers stood on a bridge at Lexington/Concord because a British column from Boston marched out to seize their muskets, rifles, powder and shot, and they wouldn’t stand for it. The “Intolerable Acts” imposed upon the American colonies by an autocratic monarch in Britain, included a 2% tax on tea and taxes on official documents. They had no representation in Parliament, and initially that is all they petitioned for, “The rights of Englishmen” to be represented in Britain’s legislature. “Disperse ye Rebels!” shouted the British major in charge, “In the name of the King, disperse!” But they didn’t. Someone—and to this day no one knows whether is was a Minuteman, a British soldier, or a bystander—fired a shot, and the battle began. Our forefathers lost. Bodies and wounded littered the ground. How could they not? A rabble of farmers, indifferently armed with their own muskets and rifles, standing in the open against trained British professionals armed with standardized military-issue weapons, fighting in formation and under discipline? But the call had gone out in the early morning via Paul Revere and Williams Dawes riding out from Boston into the countryside, and more and more armed farmers, “Minutemen” militia, straggled into Lexington and Concord. The British commander, seeing the gathering force, wisely decided to march his troops back into their Boston bastion. They won the battle and lost the retreat. It was a long, hot, dusty, bloody way down that country road back to Boston from Concord Bridge, and it seemed there was an angry armed Colonial behind every stone fence and tree, all with muskets, and all firing harrassing fire at the British column. Sending out skirmishers didn’t work, because the Colonists just scattered into the fields and farms they knew well, and many of the skirmishers, ambushed, never returned. And so it began, the long, bitter, hungry, 8-year struggle for independence.

    “Interesting story”, you say, “But why retell it now?” Because, Pilgrims, last Novermber was our last best chance to avoid another seminal confrontation like Concord Bridge. We knew it at the time, at least some of us did. We knew that if we made our best effort and gave the GOP what they asked for—a clear majority in the House and the Senate—and they kept their campaign promises to fight to dump Obamacare and to roll back the President’s illegal and unconstitutional amnesty, this nation might have a chance to reset back to strict constitutional rule “of laws, not of men”, to reduce the scope and reach of the central government and rebalance the powers of the Legislative, Executive and Judicial brances of our constitutional Representative Republic, returning to limited government and power split equally between the federal government, the States and the People.

    It is too early to call the game, folks, because the new Congress has yet to be sworn in and take their seats in the Capital, but early indications are that the Republican elites in Washington intend to ignore their obligation to keep their word to their constituents and go right back to practicing “business as usual inside the Beltway”. They will go back to playing procedural games with their Democrat opponents, scoring “gotcha” legislative points, and ignoring us yet again. It appears that the GOP elites don’t want a smaller, less intrusive, more fiscally-responsible federal government, they just want to be in charge of the pork.

    John Nance Garner, lifelong Texas Democratic politician and FDR’s 2nd Vice-President, was a plain-spoken man. He coined two memorable political phrases that have long outlived him: “The vice-presidency ain’t worth a bucket of warm spit.”(Only he didn’t say “spit”…), and “There ain’t a nickel’s worth of difference between the Republicans and the Democrats.” It appears he may have been right.

    No more. I’m done. If the House retains John Boehner as Speaker and the Senate makes Mitch McConnell Majority Leader, the game is over for us out here in the “fly-over states” where we are still mostly free men and women. It will be business as usual in Washington, D.C. and many of us will simply not stand for it anymore. It will be torches, pitchforks, tar, feathers, and rails time.

    And possibly farmers with privately-owned rifles at a bridge somewhere…

    Molon Labe, and may God defend the right.

    Phaedrus

    • JK

      Agreed.

      But I fear with the thoroughly bi-partisan passage of The Patriot Act the torches, pitchforks, tar, and the feathers can only be wielded by the mob. A coherent group of patriots most likely to enjoy the whim of the Sovereign and whatever “rails time” there might be.

      Hopefully patriots will retain their Right to the ballot, frequent turnover in the current standing army (& K Street) the only allowed remaining bridge …

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